Acorn Road, Hemel Hempstead, Herts, HP3 8DW | Tel: 01442 264 835 | Email: admin@albertthegreat.herts.sch.uk
 
St Albert The Great Catholic Primary School
October 21 2021

Computing

School Office

Intent

At St Albert the Great Catholic Primary School, we aim to develop children’s experience and understanding of ICT, preparing them for jobs of the future within a world that is heavily shaped by technology.

As we are a faith school, RE is at the heart of our curriculum and we put gospel values at the centre of all that we do. The order in which we teach the computing curriculum links in to the Liturgical Year. Computing is taught as a standalone subject but it is also integrated across the curriculum to support and develop learning.

We intend to equip our children to safely use computational thinking skills, digital literacy knowledge and creativity to understand and change the world. Computing allows our children to develop skills in finding, exploring, sharing and presenting information. These skills support our children to problem-solve, investigate and express themselves in a variety of ways, using a variety of forms. We promote the safe use of the internet at the core of our Computing curriculum coverage. Our whole school approach to e-safety helps ensure that we are able to teach children about staying safe when using internet technologies. It also helps make sure pupils themselves know how to behave responsibly online.

Implementation

Our scheme of work for Computing is from the ‘Teach Computing’ Curriculum and covers all aspects of the National Curriculum. This scheme was chosen as it has been created by subject experts and based on the latest pedagogical research. It provides an innovative progression framework where computing content (concepts, knowledge, skills and objectives) has been organised into interconnected networks called learning graphs.

The curriculum aims to equip young people with the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to thrive in the digital world of today and the future. The curriculum can be broken down into 3 strands: computer science, information technology and digital literacy, with the aims of the curriculum reflecting this distinction.

The national curriculum for computing aims to ensure all pupils:

  • can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation (Computer science)
  • can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems (Computer science)
  • can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems (Information technology)
  • are responsible, competent, confident and creative users of information and communication technology. (Digital literacy)

In the Foundation Stage, Computing is part of Understanding the World. Children should recognise that a range of technology is used in places such as homes and schools. They select and use technology for particular purposes. The children are supported in their development of this through a variety of activities.

E-Safety and Digital Citizenship

At St Albert the Great, it is paramount to us that our pupils know how to be safe online. E-safety is key throughout all key stages and is central to all of our teaching. In Key Stage 2, the children use the ‘Be Internet Legends’ scheme to develop their understanding of e-safety and digital citizenship.

Be Internet Legends.

To make the most of the internet, children need to make smart decisions. Be Internet Legends empowers younger children to use the web safely and wisely, so they can be confident explorers of the online world. The fundamentals are taught through the Internet Legends Code – This consists of five sections:

Be Internet Sharp – Think before you share

Good (and bad) news travels fast online, and children can sometimes find themselves in tricky situations with lasting consequences. But what can they do to prevent this? The answer: understand how to share smartly with those they know – and those they don’t.

Every Word Matters

  • Treat online communication the same as face-to-face communication.
  • If it isn’t right to say, it isn’t right to post. If in doubt, get guidance on what kind of communication is (and isn’t) OK.
  • Personal details about family, friends – and yourself – should stay private.

Be InternetAlert – Check it’s for real

People and situations online aren’t always what they seem. Internet Legends know how to tell the difference between what’s real and what’s not.

Spot the Signs of a Scam

  • If messages about ‘winning’ or getting something for ‘free’ feel too good to be true, they probably are.
  • Things getting too personal? Ask yourself, why would someone have private information about you?
  • Always think critically before doing anything online – and learn to trust your intuition. Be on your guard for phishing attempts – which are efforts to steal information (such as login or account details) by pretending to be someone you know in an email, text, or other forms of online communication.

Be Internet Secure – Protect your stuff

Personal privacy and security are as important online as they are in the real world. Keeping valuable information safe helps children avoid damaging their devices, reputations and relationships.

Create a Strong Password

  • Make it memorable, but don’t use personal information, such as names or birthdays.
  • Use a mix of uppercase letters, lowercase letters, symbols and numbers.
  • R3pl@ce le++ers wit# sYmb0ls & n^mb3rs 1ike Thi$.

Switch It Up

  • Never use the same password on different sites.
  • Create a few different variations of the same password for different accounts.

Be Internet Kind – Respect each other

The internet amplifies everything: good things seem more exciting, bad things seem much worse and can hurt – a lot. A great rule to live by online, as well as off, is ‘treat others as you would like to be treated yourself’. Children can have a positive impact on others and stop bullying in its tracks by refusing to join in.

Set an Example

  • Be a force for good. Use the power of the internet to be nice, not nasty.
  • Stop the spread of harmful or untrue messages by not passing them on to others.
  • Respect others’ differences.

Lead the way

  • Block mean, upsetting or inappropriate behaviour online.
  • Be a Legend. Step in and provide support to those being bullied.
  • Encourage everyone to speak up against, and report, online bullying.

Be Internet Brave – When in doubt, discuss

When children come across something they’re not sure about online, they should feel comfortable talking to a trusted adult. Adults can support this by showing they’re open to talking, even about difficult or embarrassing things at home and in the classroom.

Encourage Legendary Behaviour

  • Set clearly defined family or classroom rules and expectations around technology, and let children know of any consequences there might be for inappropriate use.
  • Rather than having one big ‘internet safety conversation’, keep the dialogue going by encouraging children to ask questions whenever they want.
  • Encourage children to talk to other trusted adults such as teachers, family friends or relatives as well.

Resources

To help with our implementation of the computing curriculum we have a variety of hardware available including:

  • A class set of Chromebooks in Years 4, 5 and 6
  • A class set of iPads in Years 1, 2 and 3 plus 20 ipads in EYFS
  • A teacher’s iPad in every class
  • A laptop for every teacher and teaching assistant

Each classroom is provided with:

  • A visualiser
  • Interactive Smart TV

All children are provided with Google Education Suite accounts and work can be accessed in school and remotely. This enables children to access learning even if they are having to isolate at home.

Impact

We encourage our children to enjoy and value the curriculum we deliver. We will constantly ask the why behind their learning and not just the how. We want learners to discuss, reflect and appreciate the impact computing has on their learning, development and well being. Finding the right balance with technology is key to an effective education and a healthy life-style. We feel the way we implement computing helps children realise the need for the right balance and one they can continue to build on in their next stage of education and beyond. Progress of our computing curriculum is demonstrated through outcomes and the record of coverage in the process of achieving these outcomes.

Useful websites

https://beinternetlegends.withgoogle.com/en_uk/interland

https://code.org/athome